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  1. #1
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    8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    As you might guess, that is the fact they played for the greatest college basketball program in the history of college basketball. No, no - not UCF. Kentucky!

    Those included and rank:

    5. Anthony Davis
    19. Karl Towns
    24. John Wall
    50. Devin Booker
    53. Eric Bledsoe
    55. Jamal Murray
    68. DeMarcus Cousins
    72. Julius Randle

    I know some will be surprised by the ranking given to Cousins, but the article states that had he not have been injured he would have been top 25.

    https://www.si.com/nba/2018/09/10/to...draft#partfour
    "The greatest obstacle to knowledge is not ignorance—it is the illusion of knowledge."
    - Daniel J. Boorstin

  2. #2

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Davis should be #2.

  3. #3
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    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Quote Originally Posted by Krank View Post
    Davis should be #2.
    Not sure how much of it you read, but you get the impression they sort of think that, too. The "knock" on AD was that he does so many things so well but nothing as good as Curry and Hardin score, for example, that he gets docked a bit. But they were quick to point out he is just now coming into his best years. I don't think there is any doubt he will be #1 on that list at some point. And being behind only Durant, Curry, and Harden - not bad.

    Here is what they wrote about AD:

    There’s a case to be made for Davis (28.1 PPG, 11.1 RPG, 2.3 APG) as the third- or fourth-best player in the league, and it goes like this: No other player—not LeBron James, not Kevin Durant, not anyone—is so consistently dominant on both sides of the ball. Davis could win Defensive Player of the Year while leading the league in scoring. He could be the captain of a top-five offense, the anchor of a top-five defense, or both. We’re nearing the pantheon days of Davis’s career—the beginning of his entry as an all-time great player, beginning with his MVP candidacy in the season to come.

    The pushback is largely a matter of respecting accomplishment. Stephen Curry and James Harden not only have all the markers of elite play, but a deeper superstar body of work and the postseason receipts to validate it. You don’t wave off two of the best offensive players in NBA history just because Davis is better than he’s ever been. A certain level of respect is owed—particularly when both Curry and Harden do so much to make their teammates’ lives easier.

    If there is any slight against Davis, it’s that his position makes it hard for him to touch as many possessions as a player like Curry or Harden. Guards who can initiate offense will always be slightly more accessible. Passing gives both a direct means of influencing a play’s outcome, to say nothing of the gravity they exert idly. Davis doesn’t really have that in his game, and that’s fine; allowing others to handle the ball frees Davis of the responsibility, allowing him to instead use his speed to its greatest advantage. Opposing bigs are at a loss when they’re forced to chase Davis, a 6’10” gazelle, around staggered screens to contest his jumper. You can use Davis in all the ways you’d use a high-scoring wing, save that he also has the face-up game to rule the mid-post and the finishing ability to dominate out of the pick-and-roll. There is very little on a basketball court that Davis can’t do.

    Part of what makes Davis so widely useful is that his shots are so difficult to contest. There aren’t many players who can meet Davis at the rim and make any kind of difference. When he goes to the block, he can’t be pushed around. Davis is taller and stronger than most of the players who guard him, and he understands how to put space between himself and his defender. How can one even combat that? To guard Davis is, really, to be at his mercy. You could transplant his skill set to any roster in the league and find room for him to thrive. Any coach running any system could build its concepts around Davis. His stardom is situation agnostic, and completely undeniable.
    "The greatest obstacle to knowledge is not ignorance—it is the illusion of knowledge."
    - Daniel J. Boorstin

  4. #4

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    If Im building a team, I take Davis well before Hardin, and dont think twice about it. Curry and Durant? Probably put Durant before AD but not Curry


    You can get bitter or you can get better....I choose better

  5. #5

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Baker, SI's reasoning is something I've heard a million times about Davis.

    For me, defining "best" is simple and, for instance, does NOT involve playoff success or any of that BS that is HIGHLY overrated in terms of assessing TRUE value of an individual player.

    Harden? Please. Nothing but excuses to list him higher than AD... and I feel the same about Curry.

    No other player, besides James, is as good as Davis at EVERYTHING... not just scoring and having a fat ass contract on a stacked team like Houston or GS.

    JMO.
    "Shut your eyes and you'll burst into flame"

  6. #6

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Clearly the lack of a post season resume is the only thing keeping him from the clear #2 slot and challenging for #1

    “Before I leave I’d like to see our politics begin to return to the purposes and practices that distinguish our history from the history of other nations,
    “I would like to see us recover our sense that we are more alike than different. We are citizens of a republic made of shared ideals forged in a new world to replace the tribal enmities that tormented the old one. Even in times of political turmoil such as these, we share that awesome heritage and the responsibility to embrace it.”
    -Patriot and Senator. John McCain

  7. #7

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    So he's not #1 b/c he does too many things too well?

    Hope these guys stay in sports blabbering and don't get a job in something important where their reasoning skills might get someone hurt.
    Saigon. .... I'm still only in Saigon

  8. #8

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Quote Originally Posted by CitizenBBN View Post
    So he's not #1 b/c he does too many things too well?

    Hope these guys stay in sports blabbering and don't get a job in something important where their reasoning skills might get someone hurt.
    Correct. He does not excel in things like bulling down the lane and flailing his arms like an epilectic on crack to "draw the foul". Thats my favorite "Harden move"


    You can get bitter or you can get better....I choose better

  9. #9

    Re: 8 of SI's Top 100 NBA Players Have Something in Common

    Boogie at #68??? He is clearly not liked. Even at #25 is shocking...he should be top 10.

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